What is a Reverse Mortgage and How Does It Work?

What is a Reverse Mortgage and How Does It Work?If you’ve recently considered your options for taking some of the equity out of your home you may have heard about reverse mortgage loans. If you meet the requirements for a reverse mortgage it can be an excellent way to tap into the value of your home, freeing up that cash to be reinvested or used for other purposes.

In today’s blog post we’ll explore reverse mortgage loans, explaining how they work and whether or not you’re qualified to receive one.

How Does a Reverse Mortgage Work?

As the name implies, a reverse mortgage is the opposite of a traditional or “forward” mortgage in which you borrow a lump sum of money from a lender to buy a home, paying it back to them over time. With a “reverse” mortgage, instead of paying the lender you will receive money from them which does not have to be repaid until you are either no longer using that house or condo as your primary home or until you fail to meet the obligations of the mortgage contract.

Note that a reverse mortgage is still a loan, which means you will still be required to pay interest on it. As your loan balance increases with principal and interest each month the amount of equity you have in your home will decrease accordingly.

Do I Qualify for a Reverse Mortgage?

According to the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, there are a number of requirements that you must meet in order to qualify for a reverse mortgage. You must be at least 62 years of age when you apply, the home you’re applying with must be your primary residence, and most or all of your outstanding mortgage debt on the home must be paid off.

If you still owe money on your original or second mortgage against the home note that part of the money from the reverse mortgage must be used to pay this debt off.

How Much Can I Borrow in a Reverse Mortgage?

Like any type of loan, the amount of money that you can receive with a reverse mortgage depends on a variety of factors. Your age, the value of your home, any outstanding mortgage debt, current interest rates and Federal Housing Administration requirements will all be taken into consideration when determining how much you will qualify for.

While a reverse mortgage isn’t terribly complex, there is certainly more to the process that can be covered in a single blog post. For more information, contact us today and we can share the specifics of how you might qualify for a reverse mortgage and whether or not it’s your best option for making use of some of your home equity.

Understanding the Principal Limit on a Reverse Mortgage and What Happens if You Reach It

Understanding the Principal Limit on a Reverse Mortgage and What Happens if You Reach ItIf you’re considering applying for a reverse mortgage, you’ll want to ensure you understand certain critical factors. One such factor is the principal limit. The principal limit will have a strong influence on your finances, which is why you’ll need to ensure you know – before applying for your reverse mortgage – what your principal limit is.

So how does a principal limit work, and how can you find out what yours is? Here’s what you need to know.

Principal Limit: The Maximum Amount You Can Borrow

Simply put, the principal limit is the maximum amount of money that you can borrow using a reverse mortgage. This maximum amount does not change if you pay off your reverse mortgage and then apply for a second one – rather, it’s a lifetime maximum that is calculated per-borrower. The principal limit is nationally legislated through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Calculating Your Principal Limit Factor

Calculating your principal limit factor is fairly simple. The Department of Housing and Urban Development maintains a chart that shows you what your principal limit factor is. To look up your principal limit factor, all you need are your expected rate and the age of the youngest spouse in the home.

The principal limit factor is useful in determining what kind of a loan you can get. The size of the loan you can expect to receive is equal to your home’s value multiplied by the principal limit factor.

For example, a 72-year-old who owns a $300,000 home with a 10-year interest rate of 3% and a lender margin of 3% has a 6% “effective rate”. According to the table, a 72-year-old with a 6% effective rate will have a principal limit factor of 46.7%. That means the most this borrower can receive through a reverse mortgage is $140,100 – which is 46.7% of $300,000.

What Happens If You Reach The Principal Limit?

If you reach your principal limit, you will have exhausted all of the money available to you through a reverse mortgage – you will have used up all of your equity. A reverse mortgage is a non-recourse loan, which means your lender cannot pursue you or your heirs to recoup their money. In the event that you choose to sell the property, all of the proceeds will go to the reverse mortgage issuer – none of it goes to the homeowner.

A reverse mortgage can be an effective financial tool, but if you use up all of your equity, it may paint you into a financial corner. An experienced mortgage advisor can help you to determine if a reverse mortgage is an appropriate financing option for you. Contact your trusted mortgage professional today to learn more.

What Fees Are Involved With a Reverse Mortgage? Let’s Take a Look

What Fees Are Involved With a Reverse Mortgage? Let's Take a LookInvesting in a home may be one of the most significant purchases you’ll make in your lifetime, but many people forget that there are a number of other costs associated with buying a home. If you’re considering a reverse mortgage and want to be clear on all of the fees involved, here are a few things you can expect to come across.

Initial Home Appraisal Fee

In order to ensure that you qualify for a reverse mortgage, you’ll need to spend a lump sum up front to determine the market cost of your home. While the amount of this fee will depend on the size and age of your home, it generally runs from a couple hundred dollars to less than a thousand and will be paid to the appraisal company that you’re dealing with.

Mortgage Insurance Premiums

At the time that you close on your mortgage, you’ll be required to pay a mortgage insurance premium (MIP) in order to secure your loan. This amount will vary from lender to lender and will be calculated based on the lesser-appraised value of your home. In addition to this, annual mortgage insurance premiums will be charged throughout the entire period of the loan and will be a percentage of the outstanding balance of your mortgage.

Loan Origination Fee

In order to process and underwrite your loan, you will also be required to pay a loan origination fee, which covers the administrative costs. While this amount has come down in recent years, it is a sizeable lump sum that hovers around 2% of your home’s value up to $200,000. If the home’s value exceeds this amount, it will go down to 1% after the initial amount is charged.

Other Third Party Fees

Like any mortgage loan, there are a number of one times fees that you’ll need to pay in order to secure your mortgage. In addition to a monthly servicing fee, there will also be fees like surveying, title fees and credit checks that will be added on to the total cost of your mortgage product. It’s important before choosing this option to ensure that you know what costs you’ll be dealing with.

A reverse mortgage may be the right mortgage product for you, but it’s important to be educated of all of the costs before choosing this option. If you’re currently considering other mortgage products, you may want to contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

Three Tips to Ensure That a Reverse Mortgage Makes Sense for Your Financial Situation

Three Tips to Ensure That a Reverse Mortgage Makes Sense for Your Financial SituationIf you’re having financial troubles, or if you need to free up a large sum in a short period of time, a reverse mortgage is a great way to get the money you need without having to take on new debt or make monthly payments. When you apply for a reverse mortgage – also known as a home equity conversion mortgage – you’re essentially borrowing money from the equity you’ve built up in your house. The great advantages of a reverse mortgage are that you don’t need to make any loan payments until you decide to move out of the house and that in spite of the interest rates attached, you’ll never owe more than the value of your home.

However, there are tight restrictions and requirements with respect to who can get a reverse mortgage and what needs to be done before you receive any money. In order to qualify, you must meet an age requrement and the property must be your primary residence. You also can’t owe more money on the property than it is worth.

So how can you tell if a reverse mortgage is a good solution for you? Here are three factors you’ll want to consider.

Will You Use The Money Responsibly?

In general, the high-cost, high-risk nature of a reverse mortgage makes it ideal for people who are having trouble meeting their everyday living expenses. That means you’ll need to ensure you use the money responsibly. Good uses of reverse mortgage funds include paying living expenses and medical costs when no other options are available, and paying for emergency care after a serious injury if you’re uninsured.

Have You Exhausted All Other Avenues?

A reverse mortgage can have significant upfront costs. The fees may be higher than other loans, which means even if you don’t actually use any of the credit you obtain through a reverse mortgage, you’ll still may be paying a large sum out of pocket. Furthermore, your lender has the authority to recall the loan if you let your home insurance expire, if you fall behind on your property taxes or home maintenance, or if you spend a full year in an assisted living facility.

These risk factors mean that a reverse mortgage is typically best used as a last resort. If you have other options – for instance, if you have stocks or investments you can cash out, or if you can sell your home to your children and then rent it back from them – you’re better off going down another route. But if you’ve already exhausted all other options, a reverse mortgage may make sense.

Are You Planning To Stay In Your Home For The Foreseeable Future?

A reverse mortgage generally works best for people who intend to stay in their homes for several years. When you get a reverse mortgage, you’ll need to take out insurance to protect against the possibility of your loan balance growing beyond your property value. That means you’ll need to pay monthly insurance premiums – and if you only plan to stay in your home for a short period of time before selling, it’s very unlikely that your loan balance will grow beyond the value of your home.

A reverse mortgage can be a convenient way to access emergency cash reserves – and when used responsibly, it’s a great tool that can help you to help you with otherwise unmanageable expenses. However, reverse mortgages can also be risky and complicated – and you’ll want to consult a professional before applying for one. Call your local mortgage expert to learn more about whether a reverse mortgage is right for you.

Reverse Mortgages 101: How This Unique Financial Product Can Make Your Life Easier

Reverse Mortgages 101: How This Unique Financial Product Can Make Your Life EasierIf you’ve been in your home for a while and have considered other loan options, you may have heard the term reverse mortgage without being aware of how this product can benefit you. While this type of mortgage works for those who have a high amount of equity in their home, here are the details on reverse mortgages and how this product may work for you.

What’s A Reverse Mortgage?

The reverse mortgage was created in 2009 as the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) and is something that can be used by those who are older than 62. As this type of mortgage does not require the homeowner to pay monthly mortgage payments, it enables those who use it to repay their loan after they move out or pass on. If the cost of maintaining your home is manageable and you don’t plan on moving, this can be a useful option.

The Requirements For Reverse Mortgages

Beyond the age requirement, those who want to utilize this product need to own their current property or have a high amount of equity in it. They must have the ability to pay any insurance and property tax on the home, and they must comply with the standards that are set by the Federal House Administration (FHA). This means that applicants may require documentation like bank statements to confirm their financial security, or even pay stubs if they are still receiving a monthly income.

The Pros And Cons

A reverse mortgage can be an option for those who don’t want to make a regular monthly payment on their home and would like to turn it into a source of additional funds while still owning it. While this can be an option to for those who want to stabilize their monthly expenditures, it’s also important to be aware that there can be higher costs associated with a reverse mortgage. In addition to a higher interest rate, reverse mortgages incur a higher overall interest payment since monthly payments are deferred until the loan is paid in full.

There are many types of mortgage products out there on the market, but you may not be aware that a reverse mortgage or the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) can be a useful option for many seniors. If you are wondering if this option is right for you, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.

Understanding the Reverse Mortgage and How to Best Use This Unique Financial Tool

Understanding the Reverse Mortgage and How to Best Use This Unique Financial ToolIf you’ve studied the real estate market recently, you’ve probably heard about the reverse mortgage. This unique tool is a financial arrangement designed for senior citizens who have limited incomes and want to use the equity in their homes to meet their everyday expenses. And although it’s becoming increasingly popular, few homeowners truly understand it.

So how does a reverse mortgage work, and when is it appropriate for a homeowner to get one? Here’s what you need to know.

What is a Reverse Mortgage?

A reverse mortgage is a loan that uses your home equity as collateral – essentially, you borrow money against the value of your home. But unlike home equity loans, you don’t have to repay a reverse mortgage until you sell your home or are no longer able to meet the terms of the reverse mortgage. If you’ve paid off your home in full, a reverse mortgage can be a great source of income if you don’t have other income streams to rely on.

However, there are tight restrictions around who can quality for a reverse mortgage. To receive a reverse mortgage, you must be at least 62 years old and you must use the property in question as your primary residence. You also need to have equity in your home – you can’t owe more on the property than it’s worth.

The Benefits and Risks of This Arrangement

A reverse mortgage is a fast and easy way to access funds. The most popular kind – a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage – is a federally insured reverse mortgage that offers strong borrower protection. Most reverse mortgages don’t have any income requirements or monthly payments, and they can provide elderly seniors with a much-needed supplemental income.

Reverse mortgages can be risky. The processing fees can be high as 5% of your home’s value. If you spend the funds irresponsibly and miss property tax or homeowners insurance payments, your reverse mortgage may come due.

How to Make a Reverse Mortgage Work for You

The best way to use a reverse mortgage is to take it in the form of a variable-rate line of credit. And according to the AARP, longer loan terms are better – especially if you may need long-term care.

A reverse mortgage can be a great tool for meeting your expenses if you’re beyond your working years. But it also carries some risks, which is why you’ll want to make sure you have a thorough plan for how you’ll use the funds. Contact your trusted mortgage professional to learn more about reverse mortgages and if they will work for you.

Are You Applying for a Reverse Mortgage? Here Are 3 Considerations You’ll Need to Make

Are You Applying for a Reverse Mortgage? Here Are 3 Considerations You'll Need to MakeIf you’re a homeowner who is looking to tap in to the home equity that you’ve spent years building you may be interested in a “reverse mortgage” or “home equity conversion mortgage”. While these unique financial tools aren’t for everyone, if you qualify for a reverse mortgage you’ll find that this might be the perfect financial solution which allows you to pay off your existing mortgage, or for some other regular expenses that you have.

Let’s take a closer look at how reverse mortgages work, including how to qualify, what happens to your existing mortgage and what a reverse mortgage might cost.

Do You Meet the Requirements for a Reverse Mortgage?

In short, a reverse mortgage is a type of home loan in which the lender pays you monthly payments or a lump sum based on the equity that you’ve built up in your home. At some point in the future – when you move out of the home, or pass away – the reverse mortgage loan will become payable.

As mentioned above, reverse mortgages aren’t for everyone. You’ll need to be at least 62 years of age and be a homeowner who has enough equity built up in your home to qualify. You’ll also need to understand that your lender will scrutinize your current financial position to ensure that you can keep up with property taxes and other regular costs that you may incur.

What Happens to Your Existing Mortgage?

If you have a regular mortgage it’s still possible to qualify for a reverse mortgage, but you’ll need to use some of the proceeds to pay off your existing mortgage. For example, if you have $50,000 owing on your mortgage and you receive a reverse mortgage for $100,000, you can pay your initial mortgage off and still have $50,000 to use as you see fit.

Do You Know What a Reverse Mortgage Costs?

Keep in mind that like a traditional mortgage, a reverse mortgage has costs attached. You’ll need to pay mortgage insurance premiums, service fees, lender fees and other third-party fees that are typically referred to as “closing costs”.

Learn More About Your Reverse Mortgages Options

A reverse mortgage can be an excellent way to take advantage of the equity that is currently locked up in your home. To learn more about reverse mortgages, contact your local mortgage professional and they’ll be able to share their guidance and expertise.

3 Completely False Myths About Reverse Mortgages That Need to Be Debunked

3 Completely False Myths About Reverse Mortgages That Need to Be DebunkedAre you a senior or retired individual older than 62 who is looking to supplement their retirement income? If so, you may have heard about a unique financial product known as a reverse mortgage. In today’s blog post we will explore three myths about reverse mortgages and share why they need to be debunked. Let’s get started.

Myth #1: Reverse Mortgages Are Expensive

The first myth we will debunk is that reverse mortgages are costly financial products that are full of fees. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. It’s true that there are closing costs attached to a reverse mortgage, just like with a traditional mortgage. These costs will vary depending on a wide range of factors, including the terms of the reverse mortgage, your financial history, your home’s location, size, assessed value and more.

If you are interested in a reverse mortgage, don’t let the potential fees or closing costs scare you off.

Myth #2: Children Inherit The Reverse Mortgage Payments

Many people believe that they are saddling their children with a mortgage payment when they take out a reverse mortgage, but this isn’t true. After you (and your spouse, if you have one) move on, whoever is overseeing your estate will have the option to sell your home and use the proceeds to pay off the balance of the reverse mortgage. Alternatively, they may decide to use cash to pay off the balance and keep the home. But your children aren’t going to inherit a monthly repayment.

Keep in mind that having a plan for your estate and a proper will is important, regardless of whether or not you have a reverse mortgage. Be sure to contact an attorney who is skilled in estate law for more information.

Myth #3: The Bank Ends Up Owning Your House

Finally, some believe that the bank will end up owning your home if you take out a reverse mortgage. This isn’t true either. With a reverse mortgage, you are borrowing money against the equity or value that you have built up in your home. You will continue to own the house, but the lender may place a lien against it to secure the mortgage loan.

These are just a few of the many myths about reverse mortgages that you might hear about or read online. When you are ready to learn more about this type of mortgage, get in touch. Our team of mortgage professionals is here and ready to assist you.

3 Ways That a Reverse Mortgage Can Transform Your Retirement

3 Ways That a Reverse Mortgage Can Transform Your RetirementAre you a retired individual looking for ways to increase your financial security? If so, you may have heard of a home equity conversion mortgage, more commonly known as a reverse mortgage. Used correctly, this is one of the most effective financial products for retirees who own their home.

Let’s explore three ways that a reverse mortgage can help to transform a dull retirement into one filled with excitement.

It’s All About Flexibility

The primary benefit that one receives with a reverse mortgage is financial flexibility. It is an excellent way to tap into the equity that has built up in your home over time without having to sell the house and move out. Moreover, unlike a traditional home loan, the payment terms are far more flexible. In many cases, payments are not required until you are ready to leave the home permanently.

An Extra Source Of Income

Is your lifestyle starting to suffer because you do not have a regular salary coming in for you and your partner? Regardless of how much you have saved in 401-k and other retirement accounts, losing that regular monthly income can be depressing.

The good news: a reverse mortgage can help to change that. The funds you receive can be used however you want. You can invest in renovations for your home, take a nice vacation, invest in the stock market or simply leave it in your bank account. It is a helpful ‘bridge’ income source that will ensure that you have no trouble taking care of life’s many expenses.

A Contingency Fund, Just ‘In Case’

Finally, a reverse mortgage can be an excellent contingency fund. If you take this out as a line of credit, the money will be available if and when they are needed. Many retired individuals lack a financial ‘safety net’ and end up suffering due to unexpected health or other costs. With a reverse mortgage, you can sleep soundly knowing that emergency cash is there if needed.

As you can see, taking advantage of a reverse mortgage can be the catalyst that helps take your retirement to the next level. To learn more about these unique financial products, contact our professional mortgage team today. We are happy to share how a reverse mortgage can benefit you and your family.

62 or Older? 3 Reasons Why a Reverse Mortgage Might Be the Perfect Financial Solution for You

62 or Older? 3 Reasons Why a Reverse Mortgage Might Be the Perfect Financial Solution for YouAre you and your spouse starting to move into your retirement years? If so, you already know that you are going to need a solid financial plan for when your primary sources of income are no longer bringing money in. If you have invested in your retirement, you might be all set. However, what if your house makes up the majority of your net worth?

Let’s take a quick look at three reasons why a reverse mortgage might be a great way to unlock the equity you’ve built up in your home.

Reason #1: This Is Your Last Home

To qualify for a reverse mortgage, you have to own your home or be very close to paying off any outstanding mortgage debt. A reverse mortgage is money borrowed against the equity in your home, which is considered collateral. So, if staying in this house is your long-term plan, then a reverse mortgage should be a good fit.

Note that it is not impossible to buy a new home or move when you have a reverse mortgage. You simply have to pay the outstanding balance as with any other loan or mortgage product.

Reason #2: You Don’t Plan On Leaving Your House To Anyone

It is important to note that when you or your spouse dies, your reverse mortgage becomes due. In most circumstances, the house is either sold or transferred to cover the outstanding amount of the mortgage. This means that anyone inheriting the house is going to inherit the reverse mortgage as well, leaving them responsible for the outstanding balance.

If you do not have any children, or if they are already financially stable and not in need of an inheritance, you may not have to leave your house to anyone. This makes a reverse mortgage a good source of extra cash.

Reason #3: You Can Afford Taxes And Upkeep

Finally, don’t forget that with a reverse mortgage, you are still responsible for taxes, insurance and maintenance costs. Falling behind on these items can cause your reverse mortgage to become repayable immediately. If you can afford these costs without having to stretch, then you’re in good shape.

If you are looking to make more of your home equity as a financial asset and both you and your spouse are 62 or older, reverse mortgages are an excellent idea. To learn more about these financial products and your options, contact us today. Our professional team of mortgage advisors is happy to show you why a reverse mortgage is a good fit.