Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You’ll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your Mortgage

Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You'll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your MortgageObtaining a mortgage can be quite a complicated process even without the financial hurdles, but if your spouse’s credit has experienced a number of difficulties, acquiring a mortgage can be even more of a burden. If you’re concerned about what bad credit will mean for your mortgage and are weighing your options, here are some reasons why it might be important to use a co-signer for your application.

Increasing The Likelihood Of Approval

From getting an education to purchasing your first vehicle, it’s a common occurrence for people to take a loan out at some point in their life. However, getting a loan can be very difficult if you happen to be married to someone with a poor credit history. While having someone you know co-sign your application is not without its risks, it can be a means of securing mortgage financing so that you can move towards a less burdensome financial situation.

Improving A Bad Credit History

It adds stress to the process if you have a partner with a poor credit history, but the benefit of a co-signer is that it can be one of the few opportunities you’ll have to really improve a problematic rating. With a co-signer to vouch for you, you will be able to pay down your mortgage consistently and slowly build your spouse’s credit in a way that will give both of you a lot more financial opportunities in the future.

Building Up Trust

It goes without saying that having a co-signer can be a significant financial risk for the person who chooses to sign for you, but – if approached responsibly – this can be a means of building trust with your family members or friends. While co-signing may be a necessity for your situation, it’s important to be aware that it’s a huge commitment for the person who agrees to it and their support should be seen for the good faith it is.

As co-signing is a considerable responsibility for the person who offers it, it’s important to ensure that purchasing a home is the right financial choice for you before asking someone to vouch for your application. If you’re currently in the process of looking for a new home, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.

Will Missing Mortgage Payments Impact My FICO Score? Yes – and Here’s How

Will Missing Mortgage Payments Impact My FICO Score Yes and Heres HowIf you’re like most homeowners, you probably believe that one missed mortgage payment won’t have a noticeable impact on your FICO score. People get behind now and then, and besides, you’ve been faithfully making payments on time for years. How bad could it be?

In truth, even one missed mortgage payment could seriously damage your FICO score. Lenders can report missed monthly payments whenever they choose – they don’t need to wait until a certain date to do it. That means even if your mortgage payment is a few days late, your lender may report it as unpaid.

So what exactly happens to a FICO score when you miss a mortgage payment? Here’s what you need to know.

Payment History: The Single Largest Factor In Determining Your Credit Score

FICO scores are calculated based on several different criteria, the largest of them being your payment history. A full 35% of your credit score is determined by how often you pay your bills on time and in full. And although FICO says that one or two late payments aren’t going to decimate your credit score, they will shave off some points that could have made the difference between a low-risk and high-risk interest rate.

Consumers With Higher Scores Have More To Lose

A 2011 FICO study analyzed the impact of late mortgage payments on consumer credit scores. The study grouped consumers into three groups based on their starting FICO score, with Consumer A having a score of 680, Consumer B a score of 720, and Consumer C a score of 780. The findings?

Even if you have a credit score of 780, being just 30 days late on a mortgage payment can result in a 100-point drop. And it can take up to three years to earn that credit back. In contrast, a consumer with a score of 680 who is 30 days late will see only a 70 point drop and can recover their original score within 9 months.

The takeaway? Contrary to popular belief, people with high credit scores stand to lose more from a missed payment than people with low credit scores.

There Are Varying Degrees Of “Late”

One common misconception is that if you miss a mortgage payment, it doesn’t matter if it’s 30, 60, or 90 days overdue. The mainstream thinking is that late is late is late. But that’s not how FICO sees it.

Although borrowers with credit scores under 700 won’t see much of a decline after 30 days late, borrowers with a higher credit score will. If you have a credit score of 720 and you’re 30 days late on your mortgage, your score will fall to about 640. If you’re 90 days late, that score will fall again this time, to about 620.

That means if you miss a mortgage payment, you need to get in touch with your lender as soon as possible in order make repayment arrangements and hope they haven’t yet reported the overdue payment. It’s your best shot at protecting your FICO score.

Credit scores can be vulnerable to all sorts of factors, which is why if you’re looking into mortgages, you’ll want to consult an expert. A qualified mortgage professional can help you find a mortgage you can afford, so your credit will stay intact. Contact your local mortgage expert to learn more.

Suffering from Credit Problems? Understanding Mortgage Lenders and How They Assess Your Credit

Suffering from Credit Problems? Understanding Mortgage Lenders and How They Assess Your CreditOne of the most significant factors a mortgage lender will review when you apply for a new mortgage loan is your credit history and rating. While some people have stellar credit, others have a troubled credit history with lower scores.

If you fall into the latter scenario, you may be wondering how lenders will assess your credit situation when you apply for a mortgage in the near future.

Reviewing Your Credit Scores

Initially, lenders will review your credit report to determine your credit scores. Your scores will have a direct impact on the interest rate that you qualify for or if you qualify for a loan at all. There are prime mortgages for good credit borrowers and sub-prime mortgages for those with a blemished credit rating.

If your scores are too low, however, you may not qualify for a mortgage. A mortgage representative can tell you more about their credit rating thresholds and the terms that you may qualify for.

High Debt Balances

Your mortgage lender will dig deeper into your credit report after an initial review of your credit rating. Your debt balances will be reviewed to determine your debt-to-income ratio. Provided your debt-to-income ratio and your credit rating are in line with requirements, high debt balances may not be an issue. Essentially, the lender will determine if you are able to make your payments on time as scheduled or if your debt balances appear to be burdensome. Even if your debt balances are high, you may be approved for a loan if you can afford to make the payments.

Difficulty Making Timely Payments

Your mortgage lender will also review the number of late payments on your credit report as well as the dates for those late payments. When late payments are clustered together, this may indicate a temporary rough patch rather than an on-going issue with making payments on time. However, if you have multiple payments that have been late over the course of the last year or two, this may indicate that you are not creditworthy as a loan applicant.

A credit report can tell a lender many things about you. While it superficially can tell a lender more about your outstanding debts, it also delves into previous financial issues and your overall responsibility with managing debt. If you have suffered from credit problems in the past, you may consider reaching out to a mortgage professional for more insight on how a lender will assess your credit situation.

Four Ways That Being Diligent with Your Mortgage Payments Can Seriously Improve Your Credit

Four Ways That Being Diligent with Your Mortgage Payments Can Seriously Improve Your CreditThe unfortunate reality is that many individuals have a lower credit rating than they would like. For many, this is caused by issues related to high debt balances, late payments and other related issues.

If you have a lower credit rating, you may be wondering what steps you can take to improve your standing with the credit bureaus. While there are several steps available for you to consider, making timely payments on your home mortgage can have a great impact on your credit. There are four unique ways that diligence with your mortgage payment may improve your credit.

Showing Financial Responsibility

First, when you make timely payments on an account, including your mortgage, you are proving your financial responsibility. Previous issues with late payments, collections accounts and other similar credit events may have indicated that you are a credit risk to lenders, but you can prove your responsibility through regular mortgage payments.

Reducing Outstanding Debt Balances

High debt balances are another common reason your credit ratings may be lower. When you make your mortgage payments on time, you will effectively reduce your outstanding balance on what may be the largest single debt that you have. This can have a tremendous impact on your rating over time.

Preventing New Derogatory Credit Events

When you are trying to improve your credit rating, the last thing that you may want is to have additional derogatory credit events listed on your credit report. Making your mortgage payments on time each month will prevent new late payments from being shown on your report. Establishing a solid new credit history from this day forward will help you to rebuild your credit rating.

Increasing The Length Of Time Between Older Derogatory Credit Events

As you regularly make your payments on your mortgage each month, more time will elapse between any blemishes or derogatory events on your credit report. Essentially, you will be making those derogatory events dated, and you will have a recent history of positive activity. Increasing the length of time between the present and your derogatory credit items is a great way to boost credit scores.

If you have a speckled credit history with lower scores than you would like, you understandably want to take steps to improve your credit rating. These are all ways that making timely mortgage payments can boost your credit rating, and you can apply these concepts to any other outstanding debts as well.

A mortgage consultant may help you to learn more about your current credit report and steps that you may take to boost your scores.

Three Tips for How to Secure a Mortgage if You Are A Self-Employed Entrepreneur

Freelancing in 2015? Three Tips for How to Secure a Mortgage if You're a Self-employed EntrepreneurIf you are self-employed, either as a freelancer or as the owner of your own business, your income can fluctuate greatly from year to year. That can make it difficult to get approved for a mortgage, although there are some things you can do to improve your chances. Here are three tips for securing a mortgage if you are self-employed.

Make Sure Your Credit Score Is In Good Shape

While your ability to pay back a mortgage is the most important factor in approval, your credit score is a close second, and that goes for every borrower, not just those who are self-employed. If you have a credit score in the high range — something above 750 or 760 — it will help you get approved for a mortgage. To boost your score, make sure you pay all bills on time, pay down your debt levels and don’t make any new big purchases or apply for new credit soon before you apply for a mortgage.

Have a Large Down Payment

The more money a bank lends you to buy a house, the more risk it is taking in that the money won’t be paid back. If you are self-employed and considered a higher risk to begin with, one way you can alleviate some of that risk is to be able to put down a large amount of money. Putting down 20 percent is standard for a conventional loan, and you should be willing to contribute at least that much. Putting down at least 20 percent also will save you money in the long run, because you won’t have to pay for mortgage insurance and you will pay less in finance charges over the life of the loan.

Have Significant Assets

One way to put a lender at ease about your ability to pay for a mortgage is to have significant reserves in the form of assets. If you have large amounts of money in regular savings, brokerage and retirement accounts, it offers a reserve for you to tap should your income take a dive. Other forms of property, such as personal and business property that’s paid off and has value, also help.

Be Prepared for Your Mortgage Pre-approval Interview by Having Answers to These 4 Questions

Be Prepared for Your Mortgage Pre-approval Interview by Having Answers to These 4 QuestionsSo – you’ve completed an initial mortgage pre-qualification and now you’re ready to take the next step and meet with your lender or mortgage advisor for the pre-approval interview. Are you ready?

At this stage of the application process your lender will dig into your financial background to ensure that you’re fully capable of making your mortgage payments and that you don’t present too high a risk. Let’s take a quick look at a few questions you should know the answers to before you go in for a mortgage pre-approval.

Do You Have a Specific Home in Mind?

If you’ve already picked out the perfect new home, be sure to bring along some of the details when you meet with your lender. At minimum you’ll want to know the price range that you’re expecting to buy in so that your mortgage advisor can try to find a mortgage that allows you to purchase the home and still meet your other financial goals.

What is Your Current Income from All Sources?

Your income (and that of your spouse, if you have one) will be a major factor in the size of your mortgage, your payment terms and the interest rate that you qualify for. If you have a significant income and it’s clear that you will have little trouble making the mortgage payments you’ll likely qualify for a shortened amortization period that includes a lower interest rate. Conversely, if you can only afford to make a bare minimum monthly payment you’ll be facing a longer mortgage term.

Do You Have Any “Black Marks” on Your Credit?

If you have any negative spots in your credit history you’ll want to ensure that you’re able to answer for them, because your lender will certainly ask about them. Be honest and confident, and remember that the lender wants your business as much as you want to receive a pre-approval for mortgage financing.

What Are Your Plans in the Next Five to Ten Years?

Finally don’t forget that interest rates will continue to fluctuate and that may have an impact on your mortgage in the near future. Be sure to share any major financial plans that you have with your mortgage advisor as they can keep you appraised of any refinancing opportunities that come about.

Buying a home is an exciting time – one that will be far less stressful if you are fully prepared for the many steps along the way. Contact your local mortgage professional today to learn more about how you can get pre-approved for mortgage financing.

Understanding the Difference Between a Mortgage Pre-qualification and a Pre-approval

Understanding the Difference Between a Mortgage Pre-qualification and a Pre-approvalIf you’re in the market for a new home and you’ve been researching mortgages, you’ve likely come across the terms “pre-qualification” and “pre-approval”. While these terms are self-explanatory in some circumstances, they are quite different in regards to mortgage financing.

In today’s blog post we’ll explain the difference between a mortgage pre-qualification and a pre-approval.

Pre-qualification: an Initial Look at Your Mortgage Options

The first – and easiest – step on the way to receiving mortgage financing to buy a home is known as pre-qualification. During this process you’ll meet with a mortgage advisor or lender who will assess your financial history including your current income and any debts that you might have. Using these numbers they’ll perform a quick calculation that suggests how much mortgage financing you might qualify for when you’re ready to buy a home.

Your mortgage professional will also answer any questions that you might have about the process, including what interest rates you may qualify for, how much you’ll need to invest in your down payment and more.

Pre-approval: A Conditional Mortgage Commitment

After you’ve been pre-qualified for your mortgage and you’re ready to start looking for a new home you’ll go through the pre-approval process. At this time your mortgage advisor or lender will take a much deeper look into your current financial situation, including pulling a credit report to assess how much risk they will have in lending you money. You’ll also complete a full mortgage application as this will allow your lender to get a conditional approval for a certain amount or range. Finally you’ll be informed about the interest rate and the terms of the mortgage once you find your new home and complete the purchase.

The Final Step: Finding the Perfect Home

Now that you’ve been pre-approved and have received a conditional commitment from your lender, you’re ready to find that perfect new home. On top of having a better idea of your price range and what you can afford, you’ll find that sellers are far more receptive to your offers as having a pre-approval signals that you’re a serious buyer who is ready to make your move.

When you’re ready to buy your new house or condo, your local mortgage professional is ready to help. Contact them to learn more about pre-qualification, pre-approval and your financing options. Enjoy your new home!

3 Classic Credit Mistakes to Avoid If You’re Trying to Secure a Mortgage Loan

3 Classic Credit Mistakes to Avoid If You're Trying to Secure a Mortgage LoanThe mortgage application process can be fraught with a lot of stress on its own, but if you’ve experienced issues with your credit in the past it can be even more taxing. While there may be a lot of things you may not be aware of when it comes to their impact on your credit, here are some things to watch out for if you’re planning on purchasing a home in the short-term future.

Applying For Extra Credit

Whether you’ve just been offered a great new deal by a department store or you’re not even thinking about it, new credit cards can pop up with deals that are quite enticing in the moment. Unfortunately, applying for new credit can actually signal to lenders that you’ve run out of credit on your other cards. Not only that, it will also have an adverse impact on your credit score each time you apply for new credit. If you’re considering a mortgage in the near future, it’s a good idea to hold off on any additions to your wallet.

Not Paying Your Bills

It may seem straightforward enough that not paying your bills is going to land you in hot water with your credit score, but many people think paying the minimum at any time will do. The truth is that if you want to keep your credit in line and improve your odds, it’s important to pay your minimum before the due date and always pay your bills. The only thing deferring payments will do is add marks against your credit, and this will be damaging come application time.

Don’t Avoid Your Credit Report

Many people who have a poor credit history are aware of the situation, but they’re also unwilling to address it. While it may be difficult to approach your credit report if you’ve had some hiccups in the past, it’s important to know what point you’re working forward from so you can move beyond it. Instead of ignoring it, get a copy of your credit report and review the numbers. Not only will this enable you to address any errors, it means you’ll be facing your issues head on.

There are a number of factors that can adversely affect your mortgage application, but by avoiding new credit and paying your bills on time you can have a positive impact on the result. If you’re currently in the market for a new home, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.

Did You Know? How Accelerating Your Mortgage Payments Can Help Your Credit Score

Did You Know? How Accelerating Your Mortgage Payments Can Help Your Credit ScoreThe tough part might be over after your mortgage has been approved, but it’s still important to keep on top of your monthly payments and maintain a good credit score for your financial future. If you’re currently wondering how increasing your mortgage payments can help your credit outlook, here are some things to consider.

Change Your Payment Schedule

Most people opt for a monthly mortgage payment, which can certainly stretch the budget but is still something that can be maintained consistently. However, what many homeowners don’t realize is that more consistent payments, like a bi-weekly or even weekly payment, can actually pay down the principal that is owed on your home. While this may seem like enough of a benefit on its own, this will also lower the interest you pay on your investment and will mean financial freedom much more quickly!

Make A Lump Sum Payment

Whether you’ve come into an inheritance or received a bonus at work, making a lump sum payment on your mortgage can be a great way of minimizing your interest and improving your overall credit. There are often limitations on the amount of money you can put down, but by adding an additional payment to the amount still owing on your mortgage, you might be surprised by the money savings and the boost to your financial profile.

Limit Your Amortization Period

25 years may be the standard amortization period for a mortgage, but longer is not necessarily better when it comes to your biggest investment. While you won’t want to push yourself too much if your monthly mortgage payment is already high, if you have the financial wherewithal to make a higher payment, it may be worth it for owning your home a little sooner. A shorter amortization period may seem like it will significantly bump your monthly mortgage, but by re-tooling your budget you can get the benefit to your credit score without sacrificing your monthly expenditures.

For many people, it is a month-to-month challenge to stick to their budget and make the monthly mortgage payment, but there are benefits to putting down more than expected. Whether you come into a lump sum amount or want to pay on a bi-weekly basis, extra payments can help to improve your credit and make your investment yours much sooner. If you’re currently in the market for a home, contact your trusted mortgage professionals for more information.

Til’ Debt Do Us Part: How to Get a Mortgage If One Spouse Has A Poor Credit Score

Til' Debt Do Us Part: How to Get a Mortgage If One Spouse Has A Terrible Credit ScoreA poor credit history is a reality for many people, but it can be particularly daunting when it comes to investing in a house. Fortunately, simply because you or yours have experienced bad credit doesn’t mean that you should be penalized in the future. If your spouse has struggled with bad credit in the past but you’re both preparing to move forward and invest in a home, here are some tips for getting it together financially.

Face The Music

Many people who have bad credit are too scared to take a look at their credit report and broach it honestly, but it’s important to come to terms with the problem so that it can be fixed. Instead of ignoring it, get a copy of the credit report and review it for any errors so that you can update these if needed and be aware of the issues impacting your credit score. While there may not be any inaccuracies on the report, knowing what you’re dealing with will give you a point to start from.

Make Your Payments

At some point, most people have missed a credit card or bill payment, but the first step involved in improving your finances and your credit is ensuring your spouse is paying their bills on time. While this won’t require paying the complete balance each month, it’s important to pay the minimum balance before the due date, and stick with it! It may seem like a small step, but over time it will improve credit and say a lot to mortgage lenders!

Save Up For Down Payment

20% is the amount that’s often suggested when it comes to a down payment, but if your spouse has terrible credit, it may be worth your while to save up more. It goes without saying that having good credit for both yourself and your spouse is important in getting approved for a mortgage, but by having extra for your down payment and paying your bills on time, you may be successful at convincing lenders you’re a solid bet.

It can be a lot more difficult to get your mortgage approved if your spouse has bad credit, but there are steps you can take to improve your financial outlook and give lenders a better impression. If you’re planning on investing in a home in the near future, contact your trusted mortgage professionals for more information.