S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

U.S. home prices rose in May, but at a slower pace. S&P Case-Shiller’s National Home Price index reported year-over-year home price growth of 19.70 percent in May as compared to April’s record year-over-year home price growth pace of 20.60 percent. Tampa, Florida led the 20-City Index with year-over-year home price growth of 36.1 percent; Miami, Florida followed with year-over-year home price growth of 34.0  percent. Dallas, Texas reported year-over-year home price growth of 30.8 percent.

Minneapolis, Minnesota, Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. had the lowest rates of home price growth, but no cities in the 20-City Home Price Index reported declines in home prices. Economists said that slowing growth in home prices could signal that home prices have peaked after years of rapid appreciation.

Affordability, Rising Mortgage Rates Impact Home Price Growth

Rapid home price growth is self-limiting in terms of affordability and the ability of home buyers to qualify for mortgages needed to complete their purchases. Rising mortgage rates also impact affordability as higher mortgage rates reduce funds available for purchasing homes. Current rates for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.54 percent last week as compared to 2.78 percent approximately one year ago.

Craig J. Lazzara, managing director at S&P Dow-Jones Indices, said that deceleration in home price growth was already occurring and he cautioned that a more challenging environment “may not support extraordinary home price growth much longer.” Analysts said that high mortgage rates and rising home prices would ease demand for homes and would slow rapid home price growth in the coming months, but they did not expect significant reductions in home prices to occur immediately.

The Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate range by 0.75 percent on July 27 and is expected to continue raising its rate range throughout 2022 in its efforts to ease inflation. As interest rates rise for credit cards, home loans, and personal loans increase, consumer demand is expected to ease and calm rapid inflation.

FHFA Home Prices Rise in May

The Federal Housing Finance Agency reported that home prices for properties owned or financed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac rose by 1.4 percent month-to-month and 18.3 percent year-over-year in May. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s loan limits impact prices for homes owned or financed by the two government-sponsored enterprises.

Will Doerner, Ph.D. and supervisory economist at Freddie Mac, said: “House prices continued to rise in May but at a slower pace. Since peaking in February, price appreciation has moderated slightly. Price growth remains above historical levels and was supported by the low inventory of properties for sale.” Signs of slowing economic growth, rising mortgage rates, and fears of recession also sidelined would-be home buyers.

S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

U.S. home prices rose in May, but at a slower pace. S&P Case-Shiller’s National Home Price index reported year-over-year home price growth of 19.70 percent in May as compared to April’s record year-over-year home price growth pace of 20.60 percent. Tampa, Florida led the 20-City Index with year-over-year home price growth of 36.1 percent; Miami, Florida followed with year-over-year home price growth of 34.0  percent. Dallas, Texas reported year-over-year home price growth of 30.8 percent.

Minneapolis, Minnesota, Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. had the lowest rates of home price growth, but no cities in the 20-City Home Price Index reported declines in home prices. Economists said that slowing growth in home prices could signal that home prices have peaked after years of rapid appreciation.

Affordability, Rising Mortgage Rates Impact Home Price Growth

Rapid home price growth is self-limiting in terms of affordability and the ability of home buyers to qualify for mortgages needed to complete their purchases. Rising mortgage rates also impact affordability as higher mortgage rates reduce funds available for purchasing homes. Current rates for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.54 percent last week as compared to 2.78 percent approximately one year ago.

Craig J. Lazzara, managing director at S&P Dow-Jones Indices, said that deceleration in home price growth was already occurring and he cautioned that a more challenging environment “may not support extraordinary home price growth much longer.” Analysts said that high mortgage rates and rising home prices would ease demand for homes and would slow rapid home price growth in the coming months, but they did not expect significant reductions in home prices to occur immediately.

The Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate range by 0.75 percent on July 27 and is expected to continue raising its rate range throughout 2022 in its efforts to ease inflation. As interest rates rise for credit cards, home loans, and personal loans increase, consumer demand is expected to ease and calm rapid inflation.

FHFA Home Prices Rise in May

The Federal Housing Finance Agency reported that home prices for properties owned or financed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac rose by 1.4 percent month-to-month and 18.3 percent year-over-year in May. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s loan limits impact prices for homes owned or financed by the two government-sponsored enterprises.

Will Doerner, Ph.D. and supervisory economist at Freddie Mac, said: “House prices continued to rise in May but at a slower pace. Since peaking in February, price appreciation has moderated slightly. Price growth remains above historical levels and was supported by the low inventory of properties for sale.” Signs of slowing economic growth, rising mortgage rates, and fears of recession also sidelined would-be home buyers.

S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Indices: National Home Price Growth Slows in May

U.S. home prices rose in May, but at a slower pace. S&P Case-Shiller’s National Home Price index reported year-over-year home price growth of 19.70 percent in May as compared to April’s record year-over-year home price growth pace of 20.60 percent. Tampa, Florida led the 20-City Index with year-over-year home price growth of 36.1 percent; Miami, Florida followed with year-over-year home price growth of 34.0  percent. Dallas, Texas reported year-over-year home price growth of 30.8 percent.

Minneapolis, Minnesota, Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. had the lowest rates of home price growth, but no cities in the 20-City Home Price Index reported declines in home prices. Economists said that slowing growth in home prices could signal that home prices have peaked after years of rapid appreciation.

Affordability, Rising Mortgage Rates Impact Home Price Growth

Rapid home price growth is self-limiting in terms of affordability and the ability of home buyers to qualify for mortgages needed to complete their purchases. Rising mortgage rates also impact affordability as higher mortgage rates reduce funds available for purchasing homes. Current rates for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.54 percent last week as compared to 2.78 percent approximately one year ago.

Craig J. Lazzara, managing director at S&P Dow-Jones Indices, said that deceleration in home price growth was already occurring and he cautioned that a more challenging environment “may not support extraordinary home price growth much longer.” Analysts said that high mortgage rates and rising home prices would ease demand for homes and would slow rapid home price growth in the coming months, but they did not expect significant reductions in home prices to occur immediately.

The Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate range by 0.75 percent on July 27 and is expected to continue raising its rate range throughout 2022 in its efforts to ease inflation. As interest rates rise for credit cards, home loans, and personal loans increase, consumer demand is expected to ease and calm rapid inflation.

FHFA Home Prices Rise in May

The Federal Housing Finance Agency reported that home prices for properties owned or financed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac rose by 1.4 percent month-to-month and 18.3 percent year-over-year in May. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s loan limits impact prices for homes owned or financed by the two government-sponsored enterprises.

Will Doerner, Ph.D. and supervisory economist at Freddie Mac, said: “House prices continued to rise in May but at a slower pace. Since peaking in February, price appreciation has moderated slightly. Price growth remains above historical levels and was supported by the low inventory of properties for sale.” Signs of slowing economic growth, rising mortgage rates, and fears of recession also sidelined would-be home buyers.

The Top Questions To Ask A Mortgage Lender

The Top Questions To Ask A Mortgage LenderWith many people interested in taking out a home loan, it is critical for potential homeowners to think carefully about which loan structure is right for them. There are a lot of home loan options out there, and potential homeowners need to make sure they consider the benefits and drawbacks of all options. This means asking the right questions. What questions do you need to ask your mortgage lender?

How Big Of A Down Payment Do I Need?

The first question you need to ask your mortgage lender is about the down payment you need to make. A smart rule of thumb is that you need to put 20 percent down for your house; however, this is a large sum of money that many people do not have. If you are buying a home for the first time, you might be able to get a home for 3.5 percent down. Always talk to your mortgage lender about this issue.

Is My Credit Score High Enough?

Next, talk to your mortgage lender about your credit score. The higher your credit score, the easier it will be for you to qualify for a home loan. You may want to talk to your mortgage lender about your credit report to see if there are any inaccuracies that need to be fixed.

Do I Need To Get Mortgage Insurance?

Do not forget to ask your mortgage lender if you need to get mortgage insurance. If you put less than 20 percent down on your house, you might need to get insurance, but your premium should go down as your equity goes up. Then, once you reach 20 percent equity in your home, you should be able to get rid of mortgage insurance. Clarify this with your mortgage lender.

Find The Right Home Loan For Your Needs

These are a handful of the top questions you need to ask your mortgage lender if you are thinking about taking out a home loan. With so many loans available, it is easy to get confused. Remember that the right loan for one person is not necessarily the right loan for you. Your mortgage lender can help you put yourself in the best position possible to be successful. 

What To Consider Before Taking Out An Adjustable-Rate Mortgage

What To Consider Before Taking Out An Adjustable-Rate MortgageIf you are purchasing a house in the near future, you are probably reviewing your loan options. There are plenty of choices available, and one option is an adjustable-rate mortgage, which is usually shortened to ARM. There are a lot of people who get lured in by the advertisements on ARMs, but are they right for you? There are a few important factors you need to keep in mind.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages Can Change Your Interest Rate Quickly

First, an adjustable-rate mortgage can change the amount of interest you owe on a home loan quickly. Typically, the ARM has an initial period during which the interest rate will not change. Then, there will be a periodic cap, which is the amount of interest that can be added or reduced to the loan in a set amount of time. There will also be a lifetime cap, meaning that the interest rate cannot rise above a preset boundary.

The Pros of an ARM

There are a few situations where an adjustable-rate mortgage can be beneficial. The biggest benefit is that the interest rate on the ARM is typically lower than the market rate when you take it out. You could get that low interest rate set for anywhere from a few months to a few years. If you plan on selling the house quickly, or if you think interest rates will drop in the future, then an adjustable-rate mortgage could be for you.

The Cons of an ARM

On the other hand, there are a few drawbacks as well. The biggest drawback is that the interest rate on an adjustable-rate mortgage could go up significantly. When this happens, you could end up getting priced out of your house. You might have to sell, or you might foreclose on your home. You need to run the numbers carefully before going with an adjustable-rate mortgage.

Think Carefully About Your Options

In the end, these are just a few of the many points you need to consider if you are thinking about taking an adjustable-rate mortgage. While they can be beneficial in some situations, they also come with a lot of risks. You should talk to a professional before you settle on a loan for your home.

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week – July 25, 2022

What's Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week - July 25, 2022Last week’s economic news included readings from the National Association of Home Builders on home prices, Commerce Department readings on building permits issued, and housing starts.  The National Association of Realtors® reported on sales of previously-owned homes; weekly reports on mortgage rates and jobless claims were also released.

NAHB Housing Market Index Posts Lowest Reading Since May 2020

The housing market is cooling off according to July’s NAHB Housing Market Index, which declined to an index reading of 55 as compared to June’s reading of 67 and the expected reading of 66. July’s reading was the second lowest posted since the start of the index and was the seventh consecutive monthly decline in home prices.

Component readings for the Housing Market Index were also lower. Homebuilder confidence in sales conditions over the next six months lost 11 points for an index reading of 50 points. Homebuilders surveyed were less certain about expected buyer traffic in new housing developments as July’s reading decreased by 11 points to 37.

Regional results were also lower as builder confidence in the Northeastern region slipped by five points to an index reading of 57. Home builder confidence in the Midwestern regions fell by six points to 49. The Southern region’s reading was 15 points lower in July with an index reading of 60; home builder confidence in current market conditions in the Western region declined from June’s reading of 64 to 48 in July. Coastal metro areas that enjoyed rapidly rising home values saw declines in home values as affordability and demand for high-priced homes shrank amid economic uncertainty.

June Sales of Previously-Owned Homes Fall as Mortgage Rates Rise

Sales of previously-owned homes fell in June with 5.12 million sales completed on a seasonally-adjusted annual basis. Analysts expected a reading of 5.36 million sales; 5.41 million sales of previously-owned homes were reported in May. Rapidly rising mortgage rates and inflation sidelined prospective home buyers concerned about higher closing costs and rising day-to-day living expenses.

Freddie Mac reported higher fixed mortgage rates last week as rates for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 5.54 percent and three basis points higher. 15-year fixed-rate mortgages averaged 4.75 percent and were eight basis points higher. Rates for 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages averaged  4.31 percent and four basis points lower than in the previous week. Discount points averaged 0.80 percent for fixed-rate mortgages and 0.30 percent for 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages.

Initial jobless claims rose to 251,000 new claims filed as compared to the prior week’s reading of 244,000 new jobless claims filed and the expected reading of 240,000 first-time claims filed. 1.38 million ongoing jobless claims were filed last week as compared to the prior week’s reading of 1.33 million continuing claims filed.

What’s Ahead

This week’s scheduled economic news includes readings on new home sales inflation and consumer sentiment  Weekly readings on mortgage rates and jobless claims will also be published. 

3 Tips for Planning Your Monthly Mortgage Payment

3 Tips for Planning Your Monthly Mortgage PaymentOnce you’ve purchased a home and decided on a move in date, it may seem like a lot of the hard stuff is over, but you still have one of the most important things relating to such a large purchase to think about: the payments! If you’re looking for a few tips on ways to approach your monthly payment, the following will steer you in the right direction so you can broach your mortgage schedule successfully.

Set Up A Payment Schedule

Many people have been in the situation of neglecting their phone or credit cards by forgetting about the payment due dates, but this can cause a lot of strife when it comes to an investment as large as your home. Instead of leaving it to chance, choose a day each month and ensure that your bank is transferring the funds over automatically so you never have to worry about missing a payment. This will help you retain a reputation as a responsible borrower and it means you won’t have to deal directly with this important expenditure each month.

Be Aware Of Ways To Pay

Instead of being in the dark about ways to pay your mortgage each month, talk to your bank about your options for making your monthly payments in a timely, hassle-free manner. Before you get into the nitty-gritty of home ownership, look into this as soon as you’ve signed off on the papers so you know the best way to approach each month. This will prepare you for your approximate total mortgage payment.

Is It Really Affordable?

If you’re associated with a lender you trust, you’ve probably already been made aware of the amount of house you can and can’t afford, but ensure you’ve sat down and thought about what all the added interest on your home means. While it can certainly be a huge financial commitment for anyone to commit to a monthly mortgage payment, being able to swing the expense consistently is the difference between financial well-being and a purchase you’ll come to regret.

Making the decision to invest in a home can be one of the most exciting things you’ll commit to in adulthood, but ensure you’re aware of just what your monthly mortgage means so that it’s not something you’ll look back on. If you’re currently on the market for a home, contact your local mortgage professionals for more information.

3 Key Reasons Why Buying Your First Home Is Like Planning a Wedding

3 Key Reasons Why Buying Your First Home Is Like Planning a WeddingYou may not see the connection right away, but buying a home and planning a wedding are two experiences that require certain skills and challenge you in similar ways. Check out the three key similarities below!

1. Budget

Whether you’re buying your first home or planning a wedding, you are likely facing one of the biggest financial obligations of your life. That’s why, in both cases, it is essential that you pick a realistic budget and stay within it.

Sounds simple, but in either case it can be difficult! Unexpected obstacles may force you to spend more than you planned, or you may find yourself wanting to overspend as you find things that would be “just perfect” additions even though they don’t fit your budget. These temptations can be expected, but it’s important to remember the big picture. When it comes to your budget, pick it and stick it.

2. Details

When it comes to a home purchase or a wedding, there are countless details to consider. It’s not a simple, pre-packaged purchase, there will always be big decisions that you have to make and if you overlook something you may regret it later on.

Some decisions that you face will be similar in both experiences: Does the location work for you? Does it work for your friends and family? What is the parking situation? Is it appropriate for the climate? Will you be satisfied with your decision in the long-term?

Other details will be more unique to the situation: Do you need a cocktail hour? Do you need a walk-in closet? What style of photography would you like? Is there too much traffic noise?

Either way you’ll have lots to think about, and you’ll become acutely aware of ‘the little things.’

3. You’ve Got Style

Both your wedding and your home say something about you, they’re a reflection of your personal style. When being presented with so many choices that are particularly catered towards your personal taste, you’ll learn what you like and what you don’t. However, you’ll also learn what it is that you absolutely need, and what you’re willing to budge on.

Whether you’re choosing a wedding dress that is both gorgeous and functional for your ceremony or deciding whether or not you need an extra bedroom in your home, you’ll learn what it is that you’d want in a perfect world, and what is absolutely necessary for your current situation.

Understanding Automated Underwriting and How It Impacts the Mortgage Application Process

Understanding Automated Underwriting and How It Impacts the Mortgage Application ProcessWhether you’re embarking on the process of obtaining a mortgage for the first time or just preparing yourself for the advances in the industry, the implementation of automated underwriting in recent years has significantly changed the application process. From the time you’ll have to wait to the documentation that is required, here are some of the details on what you can expect when dealing with an automated underwriter.

Reduction In Document Requirements

In the past, most homebuyers submitting mortgage application documents were required to go into their backlogs to provide the paystubs for the previous 2 months pay, as well as W2’s for the last 2 years. Now, with automation, most homebuyers will only need to submit their most recent paystub in order to move along to the approval process.

The Time Line Is Shortened

Since the loan approval process previously had to go through an underwriter, there was a delay between when the documents could be reviewed and approved, and how long it would take for this information to be passed on to the homebuyer. However, since a Findings Report is automatically created from the applicable data during the automated process, the timeline homebuyers have to wait is shortened considerably.

Approval Rates Are Improved

Previously, approvals that were completed by an underwriter were held to a standard that was made up of a person’s financial health and credit report, so having one and not the other could lead to a declined application. Due to the fact that automated approval is based on the degree of the deciding factors, homebuyers who previously may have been turned away have a greater chance of approval.

A Useful Bargaining Tool

While most homebuyers have identified their ideal home before getting too involved in the application process, automated underwriting actually enables those who want to apply to get approval prior to deciding on a home. Instead of being an expenditure of time, this can actually be a good bargaining chip when it comes to putting in an offer on the right home.

With the advances in technology and the ever-shifting real estate market, there are many changes on the mortgage market that are important for future homebuyers to be aware of. Fortunately, there are many advantages to the automation of underwriting that can offer great benefits to those going through the application process. If you’re applying for a mortgage soon, you may want to contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

Should You Make Extra Mortgage Payments Toward The Principal Of Your Home?

Should You Make Extra Mortgage Payments Toward The Principal Of Your Home?If you have recently purchased a house, you have probably taken a look at your mortgage statement and noticed that the majority of your first few payments are going toward interest. You do not start paying down a significant amount of the principal until later in your mortgage cycle. If you start to make more money, you might be interested in making additional payments toward the principal of your home. Is this a smart financial move? There are a few important points to know.

You Can Cancel Your PMI Sooner

One of the major advantages of making additional mortgage payments toward the principal is that you can get rid of your private mortgage insurance sooner. If you put less than 20 percent down on your home, you might be required to purchase mortgage insurance. You will need to keep paying for mortgage insurance until you reach 20 percent equity. If you want to get rid of your PMI more quickly, you may want to make additional payments to get to that 20 percent mark sooner. 

You Save Money On Interest

Of course, one of the biggest advantages of making additional mortgage payments towards your principal is that you will not have to pay as much money in interest. Interest is calculated as a percentage of the remaining balance of your loan. If you make extra mortgage payments, you can shrink the remaining balance, helping you save money on interest. 

You Could Make More Money Elsewhere

On the other hand, you may not want to make additional mortgage payments if you can use your money to make more money elsewhere. If you have a very low-interest rate on your mortgage, you might be better off putting your money in the stock market, where you can generate a greater return. Of course, the stock market is also a very volatile place, so you need to be careful about how you invest your money.

It Depends On Your Goals

In the end, you need to think about your financial goals to figure out where your money would serve you best. If you have extra money to put toward your mortgage, you could pay off your house more quickly. Or, you could put it in a retirement account. Think carefully about what works best for you.