Quick Tips For Moving To A New Home In Miserable Weather

Moving to a New Home in Miserable WeatherIdeally, when you are moving to a new home, you will want to do it on a pleasant and sunny day which makes everything much easier.

However, if you are moving in the winter, or an unexpected deluge shows up on your pre-arranged moving day, it can really dampen your enthusiasm and throw a wrench into your plans.

It can also make you worry about your possessions being damaged as you move them into your new home.

Don’t worry; it’s still possible to move your possessions in the rain, snow or cold.

All you need is a little bit of technique, forethought and planning.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are moving on a day with terrible weather:

Dress For Success

Make sure everyone in the family is dressed warmly. You will be going back and forth from indoors to outdoors a lot, so it might be tempting to not bother with your warm clothes.

However, it’s important to dress appropriately. You don’t want anyone catching a cold.

Wear multiple layers that you can take off or put on accordingly. Also, remember a rainproof layer if it’s pouring.

Ensure Safety

In snowy climates, clear the driveway and the front porch of snow and ice, and sprinkle them with salt.

This is very important to ensure that no one slips and falls while carrying boxes out of the old house and into your new home.

The last interruption you need on moving day is a trip to the emergency room.

Wrap Up Your Belongings

If it is raining or snowing you will need to protect your belongings from getting wet.

Wrap your furniture in waterproof plastic and seal your boxes with packing tape and plastic.

Invest in enough of these supplies before the moving day so you don’t have to run to the store to buy more in the middle of your move.

Keep It Clean

At your new house, set up an area at the front door with towels so that everyone can dry off the boxes and themselves to avoid tracking rain or snow into the new house.

As these simple tips point out, packing and moving in the rain or snow is a problem that can be overcome with appropriate planning.

Plus, sometimes moving in the winter can give you an advantage because there will be a low service demand that can decrease your moving costs.

How To Make An Emergency Preparedness Kit For Your Home

Home Emergency KitSome natural disasters can be forecast — hurricanes, snow storms and, in some cases, flooding. Other disasters occur unexpectedly, such as tornadoes and earthquakes. 

As a homeowner or renter , it’s a safe idea to prepare for disaster or unexpected emergency. Every home should maintain a ready, working emergency kit for such a time.

Here are some items to include in your home’s emergency kit :

  • Waterproof Container : Store items in a locking, plastic container
  • Battery-Powered Radio : A small radio can receive weather updates and emergency broadcasts. Pack extra batteries, or use a hand-crank radio, instead.
  • Light Source : Pack multiple flashlights and many spare batteries. LED flashlights are more expensive than “older” flashlights, but won’t lose battery power as quickly. Pack candles and matches, as well.
  • Water : Pack bottled water, storing larger bottles in a cool, separate place. Add several bottles of sport drink for variety, if desired.
  • Food : Pack non-perishable food such as canned fruits and vegetables; protein sources such as peanut butter or canned tuna; crackers and cookies; nuts and dried fruits. Remember to pack a can-opener, if needed. Include plastic utensils, if necessary.
  • Blankets : At least two blankets should be packed. Consider packing multiple sets of clothes, for different temperatures and seasons.
  • First-Aid Kit : A proper first-aid kit should include antiseptic, bandages, aspirin, an ace bandage, and allergy medicine for allergic reactions.
  • Emergency Contact List : Include a list of your local utility companies; phone numbers at which to contact friends and loved ones; and, your primary care physician’s number.

After packing your emergency kit, make sure to store it in an easy-to-reach location away from power lines, power sources, and any place that may be “extra dangerous” during a crisis. For example, storing an emergency kit in a garage or a shed may be safer than storing it in a basement or in a bedroom closet.

In an emergency, a little bit of preparation can go a long way. Be prepared and be safe.