5 Real Estate Professionals Who Assist You When You Buy Your First Home

5 Real Estate Professionals Who Assist You When You Buy Your First HomeSo you’re set to buy your first house. But where do you begin?

Buying a house for the first time can be nerve-racking. Most advice articles often concentrate on the steps involved in buying a house. To streamline things, let’s focus on the people who will likely be involved in your purchase transaction.

Concentrating on the finding the right professionals can help you navigate the entire buying process easier and more comfortably. Most people start with their home loan financing or locating a property with a real estate agent. Many of the other people involved in the transaction will be referred by these two important folks.

Apart from you and the seller, a number of other people will probably get involved. Some of them get involved throughout the whole process, others pop in and out, while others are optional. Below is an overview of five people involved.

Mortgage Loan Officer

First-time home buyers rarely pay all cash for their property. Most of them borrow money to purchase the property. As such, your mortgage loan officer becomes part of the process from the start to the end. From the moment you inquire if you can afford to the time of transferring ownership, your loan officer will be there.

Real Estate Agent

Most first-time buyers employ a real estate agent to assist them purchase their houses. Agents can help you find the house, draft your offer and advise you on ways to negotiate with the seller. They will likely help you circumnavigate through inspection and closing steps.

Settlement Agent

A settlement agent or a closing agent becomes involved from the moment you reach an agreement with the seller until the transfer of ownership is complete. In most cases, a settlement agent is most involved in the last days before you assume ownership.

Home Inspector

Home inspectors get involved for a short period of time. Most of them pop in, carry out an inspection, write a report and they’re gone. You may never hear from your inspector again. Your real estate agent or mortgage loan officer will most likely be able to recommend a trustworthy home inspector.

Appraiser

Mortgage lenders usually ask appraisers to estimate the market value of the house you’re purchasing. An appraiser makes sure that your lender isn’t advancing you more money than the actual market value of the house. Though the appraiser reports to your lender, you usually pay for the appraisal in your home loan closing costs.

Please keep in mind that legal requirements for transferring house ownership vary from one state to another. For instance, some states require a real estate attorney in the transfer of ownership. Check with your preferred real estate professional to get the details in your local market.

If you are in the market for a new home or interested in refinancing your current property, be sure to contact your trusted mortgage loan professional.

Questions First-Time Home Buyers Should Ask

First-time home buyer questionsNationwide, mortgage rates are low and home prices remain relatively low, too. This combination, plus rising rents, is pushing renters in some cities toward first-time homeownership.

Buying your first home can be exciting, but you should also do your research to make sure that you ask the proper questions of the process, and make the best choices for yourself and your household.

For example, recommended questions for first-time buyers to ask home sellers include :

What major repairs have been made to your home?

Although standard disclosure forms are supposed to provide information regarding past damage and renovation to the property, there are occasionally repairs that are omitted or otherwise forgotten.  Be proactive and ask pointed questions about the roof, the foundation, and the electrical system. Some home issue have a way of resurfacing many years later and it’s best to know in advance. •

To which school district does the home belong?

As a first-time homebuyer, you may or may not have school-aged children. However, in many areas, public school rankings positively (or negatively) affect home values. Ask your real estate agent for school district data. Consider asking the seller for feedback, too.

Is this a “distressed” property, and what does that mean to me?

For many home buyers, the allure of a foreclosed home or a home in short sale can be large. Prices are discounted as compared to comparable real estate — sometimes by as much as 20%. However, many distressed properties are sold as-is,” with little room for negotiation. This means that homes may be defective or, worse, uninhabitable. Ask your real estate agent for help with distressed homes and their suitability to your home buying needs.

After asking the above questions, and other questions, too, it’s important to remember that buying a home can be an emotional decision; and one that requires using your “brain” as much as your “heart”. Try to keep emotions in check so that you don’t overpay for a home that’s unsuitable, for example.