How Do You Actually Write The Check To Buy A House?

How Do You Actually Write The Check To Buy A House?After you have found the right house to meet your needs, you need to make the down payment to complete the transaction. Can you show up at the closing table with a suitcase full of cash? Of course, that would be a bit suspect, so that is not actually how it happens. What do you need to do to actually hand over the funds to buy the house? 

The Down Payment Is Verified Beforehand

First, understand that the down payment is usually verified before you agree to the deal. Your real estate agent will work with you and the seller’s agent to ensure that you actually have the funds needed to buy the house. For example, you might need to send screenshots of your bank balance or investment portfolio as proof that you have the money. Your agent will work with you to ensure your confidential information remains so.

The Funds Are Typically Given Using A Wire Transfer

When it is time for you to complete the actual transaction, the real estate attorney will handle just about everything. The attorney will be responsible for collecting the money from the sale and ensuring that everyone gets the money they are owed. The attorney will provide you with the account information for where you need to wire the money. Prior to the closing date, you need to go to the bank and work with one of their experts to ensure the money is in your account and wired to the correct account destination.

The Real Estate Agent Will Confirm The Process Is Done

It is best not to wait until the last minute to wire the money into the account. Try to do this process ahead of time, and make sure either the attorney or your real estate agent says that the process has been completed. You do not want to run the risk of missing your closing date. If you have questions about the process, make sure you give the attorney’s office plenty of time to respond to you.

Determine Your Budget With The Help Of Your Real Estate Agent

This process is important for making sure you can afford the house you want. Work with your real estate agent to ensure you have the necessary funds for the down payment.

 

Closing Costs And A Cash Sale: Who Pays?

Closing Costs And A Cash Sale: Who Pays?There are some people who are able to pay cash for a home. Typically, these are individuals who are selling an existing property that has gone up in value. Now, all of a sudden, they have a lot of extra money they can spend on a house. If you can pay cash for a home, you have a lot of extra negotiating power. When it is time to complete the sale, who pays?

What Is Included In Closing Costs?

Before deciding who pays closing expenses, it is important to take a look at what is included. Because you do not have to worry about going through a lender, you can avoid many of the fees associated with the process of buying a home. Examples include origination fees, processing fees, credit checks, and mortgage points.

On the other hand, there are several other expenses you might have to cover. For example, you will have to put down some earnest money, and you might have to pay for a property inspection and appraisal. You should also pay for title insurance and a title search. There are some states that require you to work with an attorney, and you may have to pay attorney’s fees as well. Finally, you might also be responsible for notary expenses and certain escrow fees. Keep in mind that these expenses can vary from state to state. 

Who Pays For These Costs?

Because there are still several expenses you need to pay, you will need to work with the seller to decide who was responsible for them. In a lot of situations, these costs are the responsibility of the buyer. 

At the same time, it is a matter up for debate. If you believe you have a lot of negotiating power, you might be able to convince the seller to pay for these expenses. For example, if the house has been on the market for a long time and the seller does not have any other offers, you might convince the seller to cover your closing expenses. You may want to work with a real estate agent who can help you figure out if you can convince the seller to cover these expenses. 

The Type of Home You Want to Buy Determines Your Closing Cost and Here’s Why

The Type of Home You Want to Buy Determines Your Closing Cost and Here’s WhySavvy home buyers who are preparing to make a real estate purchase should do their research and understand that they need to save money for not only the down payment but the closing costs as well. The closing costs can account for as much as three to five percent of the sales price in some cases, so this can be a rather sizable amount of money. Some home buyers however, may not realize that the amount of closing costs can vary considerably based on the home that is purchased. With a closer look at why this is, home buyers can make a more educated decision when selecting a home to purchase.

Prepaid Taxes And Insurance

One of the most significant closing costs relates to prepaid taxes and insurance, and both of these expenses are directly tied to the location and value of the property. Consider that the property tax rate can vary based on the city, county, and state. Real estate insurance can also vary based on the type of construction of the home if the home is located in a flood plain and other factors. These are only a few examples of how the location and property type can impact these fees, and home buyers should consider the costs associated with the tax rates and insurance when selecting a property to purchase.

Third Party Reports

There are several third party reports that are commonly paid for at closing, and these include an appraisal, a survey, a pest inspection and a property inspection. The third party reports may vary in cost based on the size of the home, the amount of land that is being purchased, and even the condition of the property. Those who want to keep their closing costs lower may consider learning more about how these fees are calculated up-front before finalizing their plans to buy a specific home.

Title Insurance Fees

Title insurance fees are another typically sizable expense for home buyers, and this insurance offers protection to the lender if the title is not clean. Title insurance can increase based on the size of the property as well as different factors that are revealed with a title search. This information can be difficult to learn with an initial home search, but home buyers should be aware that title defects can increase closing costs.

The location, size, age and construction of a property all impact the closing costs. Those who are shopping for real estate may be inclined to make a decision that keeps closing costs down, and they can reach out to their knowledgeable mortgage professional for more assistance with their particular situation.

The Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding the Math Behind Your Mortgage Closing Costs

The Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding the Math Behind Your Mortgage Closing CostsIt’s amazing that in a year with extremely low mortgage rates being reported around the country, closing costs are up by as much as 6% from the previous year. Part of the reason for this is that the stricter regulations on loans have increased the costs to banks, and they always find a way to pass on new costs to the consumer.

Understanding Third-Party Closing Costs

When closing on a mortgage the borrower will notice a long list of additional fees that they are expected to pay for. These can range from insignificant into the thousands of dollars depending on the state and the deal. When looking at these fees you will notice that some are third-party fees.

This is not out of the ordinary and you are not being taken advantage of. These costs are for services rendered by outside companies at the request of the mortgage lender to make sure everything is in order with the property.

Closing Costs You Can Expect To Pay

Anybody going through the mortgage process for the first time should expect to see several odd sounding terms on the bill. The first is ‘origination’ or ‘processing’ which is the primary fee the lender charges for creating the mortgage.

Other fees include discount points, flood certification, title insurance, credit report and appraisal. These are all necessary for buying a home and should be expected to appear when closing.

The Trick Behind Zero-Closing Cost Mortgages

With closing fees adding up it may seem like a good idea to opt for a mortgage that has absolutely no closing costs if it’s offered. While no money will be required up front, it adds up in the long run.

This is because the lender is making a deal. They agree to pay all the closing costs for the borrower in exchange for a slightly higher interest rate, which will pay out for them over the course of the mortgage.

The amount you can expect to pay really depends on the cost of living and real estate market where you’re buying. A mortgage specialist will be able to talk to you in advance of applying for your mortgage to give you a better idea of what you are looking at paying for closing costs. Contact one today for more information on why you have to pay closing fees and the amount you should be budgeting for.

You Are A Serious Buyer: How To Show It

You Are A Serious Buyer: How To Show ItToday, the housing market is as hot as it has ever been. There are many people who are missing out on their dream homes because they are having a hard time competing with countless other people who are in the same position as them. If you want to put yourself in the best position possible to win a bidding war, you might be thinking about paying cash for your home; however, not everyone is in the same financial position. There are a few other ways for you to show a seller’s agent that you are serious about your offer.

Get A Pre-Approval Letter

This is arguably the most important step you need to take if you want your offer to be taken seriously. One of the reasons why sellers like cash offers is that they know that they do not have to worry about the buyer’s financing falling through. If you get a pre-approval letter from a lender, the buyer will know that you already have financing in place. If you want to go the extra mile, get a pre-approval letter from a local lender. If you get a better loan offer from a different lender down the road, you can always switch lenders at that time. 

Be Prepared To Pay Some Closing Costs

Traditionally, the seller is responsible for paying closing expenses; however, if you want the seller to pick your offer, consider shouldering some of those closing expenses. This will not have a long-term impact on your mortgage rate or monthly payment, but it could help you secure your dream home. You do not necessarily need to pay all of the closing expenses, but even paying a small percentage could go a long way. 

Put Down More Earnest Money

A lot of sellers are nervous about what the inspection might show. They don’t want a buyer to back out at the last minute. If you put down more earnest money, you can show a seller that you are serious because there will be a lower chance of you pulling your offer if the inspection reveals a few repairs. You should talk to a real estate professional about how much earnest money you should include for your offer to be considered competitive. 

3 Closing Costs That Most Buyers Forget to Factor in and What You Can Expect to Pay

3 Closing Costs That Most Buyers Forget to Factor in and What You Can Expect to PayIf you’re in the process of buying a home, you probably have your deposit and monthly mortgage charges in a spreadsheet, along with a chart of your other expenses and your monthly income. But when it comes to buying a home, there are lots of different costs that will come into play – and it’s easy to forget something. When you’re preparing to close on your new home, make sure you consider these three closing costs that most buyers forget.

Home Inspection Fees: A Small Charge For Peace Of Mind

Most home purchase agreements are contingent upon a successful home inspection – and if you’re planning to buy a home, you should definitely have it inspected before you buy it. However, home inspectors don’t work for free, and you’ll have to pay a home inspector for a thorough evaluation of the premises.

Home inspection fees depend on the kind of property you’re buying, and can vary depending on your location. For a condo unit, you will typically only need to pay about $250, but a single-family home might cost up to $500. Luxury properties are often more expensive, sometimes even running as high as $1,500.

Private Mortgage Insurance: Obligatory With Small Down Payments

If you’re only planning to make the minimum down payment on your home, you’ll need to buy mortgage insurance. Mortgage insurance protects the lender in the event that you default on your loan. This is an added cost that your lender pays, and in general, almost every lender will pass the cost on to you.

You can pay for your mortgage insurance in one large payment, or you can add it to your monthly mortgage payments. Note that if your down payment is less than 20% of the purchase price, you’re legally required to buy mortgage insurance.

Lender Fees: Additional Fees to Process Your Mortgage

One category of closing costs that buyers often forget is lender fees. Lender fees are fees that your mortgage lender will charge for processing the transaction of the loan. These can include appraisal fees, credit report fees, processing and application fees, and administration fees for underwriting.

These fees can range depending on the lender, but in many cases they exceed $3,000. You’ll want to budget about $3,500 to $5,000 to be safe.

Buying a house is a major undertaking, and there are lots of ways that the process could go awry. But a good mortgage professional can help you navigate the process and get the home and the mortgage you’ve always wanted without any issues. Contact your trusted mortgage expert to learn more.

3 Reasons Why Your Closing Costs Will Vary Depending on the Type of Home You Buy

3 Reasons Why Your Closing Costs Will Vary Depending on the Type of Home You BuySavvy home buyers who are preparing to make a real estate purchase should do their research and understand that they need to save money for not only the down payment, but the closing costs as well. The closing costs can account for as much as three to five percent of the sales price in some cases, so this can be a rather sizable amount of money. Some home buyers however, may not realize that the amount of closing costs can vary considerably based on the home that is purchased. With a closer look at why this is, home buyers can make a more educated decision when selecting a home to purchase.

Prepaid Taxes And Insurance

One of the most significant closing costs relates to prepaid taxes and insurance, and both of these expenses are directly tied to the location and value of the property. Consider that the property tax rate can vary based on the city, county, and state. Real estate insurance can also vary based on the type of construction of the home, if the home is located in a flood plain, and other factors. These are only a few examples of how the location and property type can impact these fees, and home buyers should consider the costs assoicated with the tax rates and insurance when selecting a property to purchase.

Third Party Reports

There are several third party reports that are commonly paid for at closing, and these include an appraisal, a survey, a pest inspection and a property inspection. The third party reports may vary in cost based on the size of the home, the amount of land that is being purchased, and even the condition of the property. Those who want to keep their closing costs lower may consider learning more about how these fees are calculated up-front before finalizing their plans to buy a specific home.

Title Insurance Fees

Title insurance fees are another typically sizable expense for home buyers, and this insurance offers protection to the lender if the title is not clean. Title insurance can increase based on the size of the property as well as different factors that are revealed with a title search. This information can be difficult to learn with an initial home search, but home buyers should be aware that title defects can increase closing costs.

The location, size, age and construction of a property all impact the closing costs. Those who are shopping for real estate may be inclined to make a decision that keeps closing costs down, and they can reach out to their knowledgeable mortgage professional for more assistance with their particular situation.

How Much Should You Budget for Closing Costs? Let’s Take a Look

How Much Should You Budget for Closing Costs? Let's Take a LookIf you’re in the market for a new home, you’re probably trying to budget for all of the expenses that come with a home purchase. After all, the asking price isn’t necessarily the entire amount that you’ll pay – there are other expenses that will factor in to the final price. One such expense is your closing costs.

Closing costs are the miscellaneous fees you’ll pay when you sign the deal to buy your home. But how much do you need to save up for closing costs? Here’s what you need to know.

The General Guideline for What to Expect

Most mortgage advisors will tell you that you should expect to pay about 3 to 5 percent of your mortgage in closing costs. By law, your mortgage provider is obligated to give you a Loan Estimate form which is designed to help you understand the key features, costs, and risks of the mortgage loan. Three business days before the loan closes your mortgage provider will also give you a Closing Estimate form to review all of the costs of the transaction including all closing costs.

How Your Closing Costs Break Down

Your lender will give you a breakdown of costs in your Loan Estimate and Closing Estimate. But in general, there are certain closing costs you can expect to pay.

One cost that most lenders include is the loan origination fee, a small charge to compensate the lender for the time it takes to prepare the initial loan documents. There will also typically be a loan application fee, which can vary per lender.

Your lender may require you to get private mortgage insurance depending on your situation. The title search and title insurance to protect your lender from title fraud is another fee you should consider, and you’ll also likely want to buy title insurance to protect yourself.

There are also several other closing costs to keep in mind, like escrow fees, notary fees, pest inspections, underwriting fees, and the mortgage broker’s commission. All in all, you’ll want to budget approximately $5,000 in closing costs for every $100,000 you borrow.

Closing costs can be quite expensive, which is why you’ll want to make sure you budget appropriately when you buy your new home. A mortgage professional can help you to figure out how much you need to budget for closing costs. Call your local mortgage advisor today to learn more about budgeting for the home buying process.

How Negative Closing Costs Work

Get Paid To Refinance: How Negative Closing Costs WorkIf you want to save money on your home loan, you might be thinking about refinancing your mortgage. You might be able to replace your existing mortgage with a home loan that has a lower interest rate. Even a single point reduction in your interest rates could save you tens of thousands of dollars over the life of your loan. Before you refinance, be sure to ask about closing costs. Because you are replacing your existing home loan with a new one, you may incur some closing expenses. On the other hand, you could also have negative closing costs. In this case, you might get paid to refinance. How does this work? 

The Lender Credit Exceeds The Loan Costs

If you receive a lender credit that is greater than the value of the closing costs, then you could get paid to refinance your home loan. For example, your closing costs could be $2,000. Then, your lender credit could be $2,500. In this case, you would get paid $500 for refinancing your home loan. Why would you receive a lender credit, and how can this exceed your closing expenses?

How To Qualify For Lender Credits

You receive lender credits if you refinance to a lower rate that offers a lender credit. For example, at the original home loan closing, you might have paid points to get a lower interest rate. With lender credits, the lender is paying you to refinance. 

If you qualify for a lender credit, there are several ways you might receive this money. The money could be used to prepay your mortgage interest, it could be placed in an escrow account to cover your homeowners’ insurance or property taxes, or could be directly applied to the principle of your home loan, reducing the amount of money you owe.

Always Look At Closing Costs During The Refinance Process

There are a lot of moving parts if you decide to refinance your house. Even though it may sound complicated, it could save you tens of thousands of dollars while freeing up additional cash. If you have owned your home for several years, it might be time to refinance. Reach out to a professional to learn more. 

Major Mistakes Which Are Sure to Increase Your Closing Costs

Three Major Mortgage Mistakes Which Are Sure to Increase Your Closing Costs When shopping for a mortgage, it is important to take closing costs into account. While some closing costs are the same for all lenders, different programs may add or reduce some of the burden borrowers face when closing on a home loan.

Let’s take a look at some major mistakes that could result in borrowers paying more than they need to in closing costs.

1) Failing to Take Property Taxes Into Account

Property taxes are generally put into an escrow account that is established prior to closing on the home loan. In most cases, a homeowner will have to pay 12 to 14 months’ worth of property taxes prior to close.

This can represent several thousands of dollars or more depending on the property taxes associated with a property. While everyone has to pay property taxes, finding a home in a low tax area can significantly reduce the cost of closing on a loan.

2) Failing to Ask Lenders for Credits Toward Closing Costs

A lender may have a program in place that enables them to give a borrower a credit toward applicable closing costs. While this generally may not count toward the down payment, it can still be a significant help for first-time buyers or anyone else who may not have thousands in a bank account ready to pay for lawyers or titling fees.

Depending on where the property is purchased, there may be programs available that provide funding for those who promise to stay in the property for a certain amount of time.

3) Failing to Ask the Seller for Concessions

The seller of a property may offer up to 6 percent of any closing costs associated with the sale of the property. While a seller does not have to offer any concessions, they could potentially provide hundreds or thousands of dollars that may not need to be repaid.

In addition to closing cost support, a seller could also provide appliances or other items that can further save a buyer money during and after the purchase is finalized.

A home buyer can save a lot of money by taking simple and common sense actions. By doing research into cost saving programs and credits toward closing costs, those who may have felt that home ownership was beyond their reach may be able to achieve their dream. To learn more about closing costs, you may wish to talk to a mortgage professional in your area.